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If you have traveled through the state in the past, then you may be familiar with the City of Lumberton, which is just around an hour away by car. Interstate 72 passes through this region and regularly floods, which means that people who are driving there have to be particularly cautious of their speeds.

On Nov. 12, there were again reports of serious wrecks and flooding on the highway near Collins Drive and the Britts Fire Department. The city saw flooding throughout the area, but more dangerous was the Lumber River that was expected to crest after the rainstorm.

State Troopers reported that they had been responding to a greater number of crashes because of the weather conditions, and motorists were being warned to avoid downed power lines.

As a driver, how should you handle approaching a flooded area?

When the rain is heavy and you start to notice that water is pooling, you need to know what to do. It is imperative that drivers do not drive through flooded areas regardless of how deep they think the flooding is. Floods can quickly ruin your vehicle, and if the water is moving, your vehicle could be swept away.

In flooded areas, the Department of Transportation may come out to place warning signs or detours, but if it has not done so yet, remember that you should try to get through the area on higher ground.

  • If you’re traveling through heavy rain and cannot stop yet, you should:
  • Leave twice as much space between yourself and the next vehicle
  • Don’t brake suddenly if you think you’re aquaplaning

Use your fog lights if needed, but remember to turn them off when the visibility gets better

These are some tips that can help you avoid a breakdown or crash in a flood. If you are hit, keep your hood closed and try to move your vehicle to the side of the road. Call for assistance, so the emergency team can come out to you with support.