Select Page

Many parents feel overly protective of their kids immediately following a divorce. While you naturally want to safeguard your child from bad feelings and hurt caused by the split, overparenting can actually harm your relationship with your child in the long run. Very Well Family explains the signs of overparenting so you can maintain a loving and healthy relationship with your child no matter what.  

Failure builds character and teaches kids how to be gracious about defeat. Virtually all parents find it tough to watch their kids fail, to the point where they might provide assistance above and beyond what’s considered healthy. For example, supplying your child with answers to homework problems prevents him or her from developing essential problem-solving skills. It also prevents a kid from learning from past mistakes, which is an extremely beneficial life skill to learn. 

You may also impose strict standards on your child in terms of his or her choices. Independence is key when a child is growing up. Making one’s own decisions is empowering and helps with the development of a unique personality. While you may disagree with your child’s choices regarding style of dress or other minor matters, you must not impose your manner of thinking on your child. This level of micromanagement can lead to unnecessary disputes and power struggles. 

Consider your current relationship with your child. Do you typically fight over small matters? Are you also at odds with other adults in your child’s life, such as teachers or relatives? If so, chances are good that you’re overparenting your child. Take a step back and look at your motivations. It could be that you’re projecting your own fear of failure onto your child without even realizing it.